Tuesday, 28 August 2012

Maz and Sid’s afternoon out!

Sid and Maz are the most affectionate and sociable kittens we have on our rehoming kitten corridor at the moment! Sid and Maz were very poorly when they came to us, after weeks of TLC they were nursed back to full health. They have been up for rehoming for a month now; they are still waiting for someone to choose them. Last week their siblings Harvey and Bianca moved in next door. Harvey was mentioned in our previous blog post, he needs a special home as he is partially sighted. Harvey and his sister Bianca are just as friendly and sweet as Maz and Sid.



This afternoon Sid and his sister Maz went out in to our outdoor playpen for the first time ever. We wanted to give them some much needed exercise. They are typical lively kittens who are full of beans! It’s also a good chance for them to experience what a garden is like and they can get some fresh air and sunshine too. When they were let out of their basket, Maz and Sid wasted no time and quickly ran around exploring their new surroundings.



 Maz started to run around in the grass and while Sid found a tunnel to explore. She soon thought it would be fun to chase Sid around the pen and hide in the tunnel or under the chair and pounce on Sid. Both kittens were chasing each other and playing hide and seek for ages. Sid may only have one eye, it does bother him, he still loves to play games and enjoys running about. After half an hour of playing, they had a quick break and stretched out on the grass in the sun. Maz soon decided she had enough of relaxing and decided on pounce on a sleepy Sid. They started running around the pen, chasing each other, hiding in the grass or tunnel and pouncing on each other.   



Maz and Sid loved their afternoon in our outdoor playpen. These kittens are truly wonderful, affectionate and very playful, they will make any house a home. They love each other so much, they would need to stay together. They would need a home in a safe place away from busy roads and traffic, so they can safely explore the world around them. 


If you would like to adopt Maz and Sid, please contact us on 01395 232377 or please visit our website at www.axhayes.cats.org.uk for more information about our homing policy. Please visit our Facebook page too :-)

Thursday, 23 August 2012

Blind cats - Special Appeal Ganesh and Harvey

Depending on the cause, blindness can be partial or complete and can be reversible or permanent. If your cat is blind he will adapt very well to the loss of sight and can live a perfectly happy, healthy life. Blind cats compensate for their lack of sight by using their other senses more.

What causes blindness?
Some of the most common causes of blindness include:
-          Cataracts (when the eye lens becomes opaque) as a result of an injury to the eye, diabetes or an inherited problem
-          Glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye – as a consequence of an injury, tumour or inherited disease
-          High blood pressure resulting in detachment of the retina – often caused by an overactive thyroid gland or kidney disease
-          Degeneration of the retina – can be caused by dietary problems, toxins, infection or inherited disease
-          Dry eye, as a consequence of feline herpes virus, or an eye injury
-          Tumours in one or both eyes
-          Injury

If your cat is suffering from one or more of these conditions, he will usually require regular check-ups with your vet.


 What are the signs that my cat is going blind?
The first signs you will usually notice if your cat is going or has gone blind include:
-          Bumping into things, particularly furniture that has been moved – this may be more apparent at night or in low light
-          Disorientation or change in normal behaviour
-          If blind in one eye, a cat may be startled by sudden movements on their blind side
-          A change in appearance of the eye – it may become enlarged, cloudy or change colour
-          Swelling or discharge from the eye
-          Pain in the eye – your cat may resent being stroked on the head or face or may squint and try to keep the eye closed

How do I help my blind cat adapt?
A blind cat can become disorientated easily. Certain precautions will help ensure that your cat adapts to the blindness as smoothly as possible. Here are a few tips:

Going outside
Cats Protection recommends that you do not let blind cats roam for their own safety. Keep your cat indoors unless he has access to a safely-fenced garden or run. Your cat may enjoy walking in the garden using a harness and lead, but make sure he is wearing a properly-fitted collar with a safety catch stating his address and disability in case he escapes.

Finding his bearings
A blind/partially sighted cat can become disorientated easily. Try to encourage your cat to walk around on his own as carrying him may cause him to become disorientated. Cats have scent glands on their paws that allow them to leave a trail of scent to follow – this is even more important for blind cats. If you do have to carry him, always put him back down somewhere familiar.

Approaching your cat
It’s important to talk to your cat as you approach him to avoid startling him. If your cat is blind is on eye, try to approach him for the side he has sight in.

Getting around
As blind cats rely on scent and memory to find their way around, you should avoid moving furniture, food and litter trays. Don’t leave obstacles in unexpected places where your cat could walk into them. If you have stairs, place a barrier across them until your cat knows where they are and learns to use them again.

Play and exercise
Sound is obviously very important to a blind cat so he may enjoy playing with “jingly” toys. It is important to encourage him to exercise so that he does not become overweight

We currently have two adorable kittens who need special homes as they are both partially sighted.

Harvey and Bianca – If you’re looking for two happy-go-lucky kittens, they are the ones for you. Harvey and Bianca are extremely loving, affectionate and playful too. Harvey has limited vision him and Bianca will need to go to a special home with an enclosed garden. Harvey is really playful even though he has limited vision, it doesn’t seem to bother him. He loves to run around, play with toys and play games with his sister Bianca.














Ganesh – Ganesh is a wonderful little kitten who is looking for a very special person to adopt her as she has limited vision. She does not seem to be bothered by this at all in herself and runs about and plays just like any other kitten. Ganesh will need a special home that will be safe enough and maybe someone who can dedicate time to keeping an eye on her. She is a loving little soul who just needs a chance.


These kittens will need a safe home with an enclosed garden. If you would like more information about adopting Ganesh or Harvey and Bianca, please visit our official website at www.axhayes.cats.org.uk or please call us on 01395 232377, thank you.

Harlequin's story

Harlequin is one of our adorable oldies, she has moved to our rehoming corridor this week. She was named after the shopping centre in Exeter where she was found wandering aimlessly and very lost. She would love someone to care for her. She was a little bedraggled on her arrival. After many weeks of seeing the vet and lots of TLC from our cat care assistants; she is feeling and looking much better. Harlequin is 10 years old and she is still very lively and she loves to play games. She loves batting ping pong balls around her pen. 

This afternoon CCA Therese gave Harlequin a box to play in, she loved it! She loves sitting on top of the box and watching the world go by. She enjoyed playing inside the box too. She climbed on to Therese's lap and enjoyed being made a fuss, she loves attention.

Harlequin is looking for a home where she can be loved again. If you would like to adopt her, please contact us on 01395 232377 or please visit our official website at www.axhayes.cats.org.uk thank you.   

Wednesday, 22 August 2012

Daffyd's story

Daffyd had been at Axhayes for nearly six months now. Sadly Daffyd was left on our door step on St David’s Day, hence his Welsh name to honour this day. He is a very sweet and gentle boy and he has lots of love to give. He is popular with all of the staff and volunteers at the centre.


When Daffyd was abandoned that day, he was in a real state, very poorly and very thin. We knew something was wrong with him; he was quickly taken to our vets. He has been diagnosed with intestinal problems, which we have managed to get under control. He is on a special diet and on medication which may or may not continue. His medication may put some adopters off, however, he is an absolute star taking his medication. This medicine is sprinkled on to his food and he’s easy to pill too. We have managed to build up his weight, he is no longer skin and bone and he is looking much better. His fur is starting to look shiny; he is now a very handsome tabby cat.  

Daffyd has had a few adventures at Axhayes compared to some cats. During his stay on our holding section of the centre, he met thirty school children who came in for a tour of the cattery and had an educational talk. Daffyd was an absolute star with the children, he really liked the children stroking and making a fuss of him. As part of their school work, some of the children wrote stories about Daffyd too.    


During his time he was taught a special party trick by CCAs Anna and Diane, by doing high-fives. He will run over to you, sit in front of you and high-five with his front paws. On a number of occasions has enjoyed playing with catnip balls which have been handmade by our CCA Lynne. He loves to bat them around his pen and roll around on the floor. He’s really playful and full of energy.










Our CCAs are making sure they keep him as happy as they can, he can feel depressed now and again. We need to make sure he gets plenty of attention and doesn’t get too fed up and lonely. Like many of our long stayers, we do our best to give them some time away from their pen. We make sure Daffyd visits our outdoor playpen, so he can enjoy the fresh air and to lay in the sunshine. This has been a bit difficult with our British summer. When we have nice days, we make sure he gets a chance to go outside. He loves to sunbathe in the grass on sunny warm days. He loves visitors to the play pen too, some of our CCAs will sit in the sunshine with him, and he just loves the attention. He loves human company and he can become lonely so we need to make sure we spend lots of time with him. Many of our CCAs and volunteers have a soft spot for him, no one can resist spending quality time with him.


Daffyd is good with other cats, dogs and the children he has met at the centre. We are looking for someone to give him a home where he will be loved forever and will keep maintaining his medication. He is very good taking this medication. Daffyd would make a lovely companion and loving family member, if you would like to adopt him, please get in touch with us. Please call us on 01395 232377 or please visit our website for more information.

Tuesday, 14 August 2012

Special Appeal - Ganesh

We would to introduce you to Ganesh, she is one of our many kittens looking for a new home. She has limited vision and needs a very special home that will be safe enough...


Ganesh is a wonderful little cat who is looking for a very special person to adopt her as she has limited vision. She does not seem to be bothered by this at all in herself and runs about and plays just like any other kitten.
Ganesh will need a very safe environment to explore and maybe someone who can dedicate time to keeping an eye on her. She is a loving little soul who just needs a chance. If you are that special someone please contact us on 01395 232377 for more information about her..

Here are a few tips about how to help blind or partially sighted cats adapt in your home…  

Finding his bearings
A blind/partially sighted cat can become disorientated easily. Try to encourage your cat to walk around on his own as carrying him may cause him to become disorientated. Cats have scent glands on their paws that allow them to leave a trail of scent to follow – this is even more important for blind cats. If you do have to carry him, always put him back down somewhere familiar.

Approaching your cat
It’s important to talk to your cat as you approach him to avoid startling him. If your cat is blind is on eye, try to approach him for the side he has sight in.

Getting around
As blind cats rely on scent and memory to find their way around, you should avoid moving furniture, food and litter trays. Don’t leave obstacles in unexpected places where your cat could walk into them. If you have stairs, place a barrier across them until your cat knows where they are and learns to use them again.

Play and exercise
Sound is obviously very important to a blind cat so he may enjoy playing with “jingly” toys. It is important to encourage him to exercise so that he does not become overweight

Going outside
Cats Protection recommends that you do not let blind cats roam for their own safety. Keep your cat indoors unless he has access to a safely-fenced garden or run. Your cat may enjoy walking in the garden using a harness and lead, but make sure he is wearing a properly-fitted collar with a safety catch stating his address and disability in case he escapes.

Blind and partially sighted cats can adapt and lead remarkably normal lives with a little help. If you would like more information about adopting a Ganesh, please contact us on 01395 232377, thank you. Please visit our official website at www.axhayes.cats.org.uk for more details about our adopting any of our cats and kittens.

Thursday, 9 August 2012

Cat Grass/Cocksfoot

Our CCA Michelle has been busy growing pots of cat grass for some of the cats at the centre this summer. Some cats like to chew grass, not only does it help to aid digestion but it helps them regurgitate hairballs that have accumulated in their stomach through grooming.

There is a type of grass that cats particularly like called Cocksfoot. It has long board leaves so it is easy for them to bite. If your cat cannot go outside, for example cats with FIV, Cocksfoot grass (dactylis glomerata) can be grown indoors. Some of our cats who have been with us for a few months now were given pots of cat grass in their pens, which they all liked to chew. You can buy seeds from garden centres, pet shops and from Cats Protection.


How to grow car grass

Cat grass/Cocksfoot can be grown indoors or in the average garden.

-          Fill your pot or container with potting soil, leaving a half-inch of room at the top of the pot. Make sure you use a pot or container with sufficient drainage so any surplus water does not accumulate.
-          Take a small handful of seeds and place them just below the surface of the potting soil. Make sure they are covered, but not planted too deep.
-          Water your pot every day until the grass shoots begin to appear, don’t water too much, just lightly dampen the soil.
-          Place the pots on a window sill or an area where the grass can obtain plenty of sunlight.
-          Allow the shoot to grow to a height of about 3 or 4 inches, and then place the pot where your cat can enjoy the tender shoots.

Allow your cat to graze for a day or two then take the grass away to allow it to grow back.

In the garden...

Cocksfoot grass can also be grown in the average garden. You will need to add a small quantity of complete fertiliser to the soil. Sow the seeds at any time if grown in the house, or during April or early September if in the open grown, providing the soil is not sticky. Cover the seed with fine soil to a depth of no more than a quarter of an inch. Seeds which are sown in the open should be protected by a plastic/glass cover until the grass is an inch high, especially if sown during cold weather. For more advice on growing cat grass/cocksfoot, please contact us.

We have lots of adorable cats and kittens looking for homes, we are open every day from 11am until 4pm. Please contact us on 01395 232377 to book a home visit or please visit our official website and facebook page. Thank you.   


Kittens, kittens and more kittens at Axhayes!

The summer is the busiest time of the year at Exeter Axhayes adoption centre with lots of mums and kittens coming into the centre. Half of our rehoming section is full of pairs of kittens looking for homes. They are all looking for loving safe homes to go to as soon as possible, because no-one wants to spend their kittenhood in a pen! They really want to experience their first adventure in a nice garden, to play in the grass and look at all the wonderful things that summer brings.

Here are just some of the kittens we have looking for new homes….

Foxglove and Bluebell
4 month old male black and white kitten and female black kitten  

We are the first kittens to be born at Axhayes this year. We were born on Mother’s Day which was a special day for our proud mum. Our mother has done a great job bringing us up and now we can’t wait to go out and explore the big wide world. We are full of energy, we love to play and we are all very friendly. We are looking for a home in a safe area away from busy roads and traffic. We are good with cats, dogs and children. We would make a wonderful addition to your family, please adopt us today!
Please check out their video "The Life of an Axhayes kitten" on our youtube channel; www.youtube.com/user/catsprotectionexeter












Millie and Baxter
4 month old female black kitten and male ginger kitten

These adorable kittens found themselves at the centre when their mother had no place to call home. They are a wonderful: very friendly, affectionate and playful kitten, who are now looking for a home where they will be loved forever. They need a home with a safe garden so they can play and explore the world around them. We are sure they will make a wonderful addition to your home, please adopt Millie and Baxter today!


Cumari and Mirasol
3 month old male ginger and white kitten

We were born here at Axhayes to a mother who is only a kitten herself. Our mother has done a fantastic job raising us, now we are looking for someone to take us home. We are both very friendly, affectionate and very energetic. We love cuddles and we love to play games. We are looking for a home where we will be loved forever and where we can enjoy our kittenhood to the full. We are looking for a home in a safe place away from busy roads and traffic. We are great with other cats and dogs; we can fit into a family home well. Please adopt us today, we will make your house a home.


Maz and Sid
4 month old female tortoiseshell & white kitten and male black and white kitten

Hi we’re Maz and Sid and we were brought to the centre because our owner had too many cats to cope with. If you’re looking for two happy-go-lucky kittens, we’re the ones for you. I'm the cute & cuddly one that's lucky to have a friend like Sid. He's special because he's only got one eye but that doesn't stop him being any less playful. We do need a home in a safe area as we are not used to traffic. If you watch Home & Away you will recognise our names and like the song goes…. You know we belong together, you and I forever & ever, closer each day, Home & Away.
Please check out their video "An afternoon with Sid and Maz" on our youtube channel; www.youtube.com/user/catsprotectionexeter












Jagger
4 month old male black kitten

Poor Jagger was found wandering the streets with no place to call home. Jagger is a wonderful little chap who loves attention, cuddles and to play games. He is very friendly and energetic. He’s good with dogs, cats and children; he will fit into a family perfectly. He is looking for a home away from busy roads as he is not used to traffic. Jagger will make your house a home, please pick him today!


William and Whiskers
3 month old male black and white kitten and 3 month old female black kitten

My sister and I were bought into the centre after we were born outside in the cold. So after we were bought in here its understandable we are now a little unsure of everything. Don't let this put you off as we can assure you we are two of the sweetest kittens once we gain your trust. We love nothing more than to play and explore so we need a nice safe garden away form traffic as we are not used to this. If you can offer us a little time and patience we need, we will reward you with a life time of love and entertainment.












All of our kittens are neutered, vaccinated, microchipped, treated for fleas and worms, they also come with four weeks of free Petplan insurance. We give our cats and kittens love and cuddles for free...however whilst in our care, veterinary treatment for any one cat could cost £200 or more. With this in mind, we ask for an adoption fee of £60 per cat/kitten, and we are confident that you will appreciate the great benefits and value that this fee represents to you, and how it can in turn help Cats Protection to help more cats and kittens in need.

If you are able to offer some of our kittens a home, give us a call on 01395 232377 or visit our official website and facebook page for more information! Thank you.

Sunday, 5 August 2012

Neutering

Cats Protection believes that having your cat neutered is an essential part of responsible cat ownership.

What is neutering?
Neutering is a surgical procedure which prevents female cats, known as queens, becoming pregnant and male cats, known as toms, making females pregnant.
-          A female cat is spayed (her ovaries and uterus are removed)
-          A male cat is castrated (his testes are removed)

Cats Protection recommends the neutering of domestic cats from four months of age, but you should seek advice from your vet for each individual cat.

Why neuter?  
Neutering has many health benefits, as well as helping to reduce the number of unwanted cats in the UK.

Neutered male cats are:
-          Less likely to roam, reducing the risk of them being run over
-          Less likely to fight, reducing the risk of them getting injured.
-          Less likely to contract serious diseases such as feline immunodeficiency virus
(FIV), and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) through fighting.
-          Less likely to display territorial behaviour such as spraying.
Unable to develop tumours of the testicles.

Neutered female cats are:
-          Unable to become pregnant and have unwanted litters of kittens.
-          Not going to call or wail, as un-neutered queens do when in season.
-          Less likely to contract diseases such as FIV and FeLV spread by bites.
-          Unable to develop cancer of the ovaries or uterus.
-          Less likely to develop mammary cancer - especially if neutered under the age of six months.



Neutering Facts… Did you know?
-          There are around 2.5 million stray cats living in the UK.
-          One un-neutered female cat can produce 20,000 descendents in just five years.
-          Cats become sexually active from about four months old.
-          It is not beneficial for a cat to have 'just one litter' before being spayed.
-          Gestation (the length of pregnancy) in cats is just nine weeks, and a female cat came come into season again just six weeks after giving birth.
-          Pregnancy and motherhood are physically very demanding for a cat, and repeated pregnancies take their toll.
-          Cats will breed with their brothers and sisters.
-          A cat can have up to five litters a year with five or six kittens in each litter. 
-          That adds up to 18 caring homes for Cats Protection to find each year, from just one cat!     

The Operation
Your cat will have an anaesthetic on the day, so he or she should be given no food prior to the operation - your vet will advise you about this.  The operation for both male and female cats is very simple so you will usually be able to drop your cat off and pick him or her up on the same day.
Female cats will have a small shaved area; this fur will grow back in a couple of weeks.  She will also have stitches.  If these are not dissolvable, they will be taken out by the vet around ten days after the operation. Cats usually recover very quickly from the operation. Your vet will advise on the best care for your cat as he or she recovers.



How Much does it Cost?
The cost of your operation varies according to what part of the country you live in and the vet you use.  The average cost for a male cat is between £20 and £40 and the average cost for a female cat is between £30 and £60.  Your vet will be happy to give you a quote before the operation takes place.  Cats Protection offers financial assistance to cat owners on benefits or low incomes to help with the cost of neutering.  Please call 01395 232377 to see if you are eligible for help with the cost of neutering you cat.


Frequently asked questions

When can a female cat start reproducing?
Puberty usually occurs at around five to eight months in cats, although it can happen as early as four months depending on the breed of cat. We recommend neutering both male and female cats from an early age. However, it is important to note that the vet responsible for your cat will specify when they are prepared to carry out the neutering operation - usually at around four months of age. Your vet will consider each case on its own merits. Cats Protection’s current policy is to neuter pet cats from four months and ferals from weaning age.

Can you tell me about early neutering? 
Early neutering is proven to be a safe and effective method, avoiding many of the potential complications of neutering later in life.

There is no evidence to show that it inhibits growth, or causes urinary problems, and experience show kittens resume their normal activities and routines after surgery much more quickly than adult cats.

What is the process for neutering?
You’ll need to book an initial appointment for the operation. Vets may require the cat to be brought for a pre-anaesthetic check before the day of the operation. The cat will normally be admitted between 8am-10am in the morning and able to be picked up that evening and will need to have been kept indoors without food for some of the night before. Your vet will advise.




Will the neutering process hurt my cat? 
Modern anaesthetics and pain relief mean that the process is really painless these days. Many vets also operate using a tiny incision on the left side of the cat, reducing pain in comparison to the equivalent procedure in dogs or humans. Vets will also give the cats pain relief injections covering the period after surgery. If you are unsure, please speak with your vet.

What aftercare will the cat need?
The vet will probably advise you to keep the cat indoors for a few days after surgery. It may need to wear a buster collar, a plastic lampshade shape collar to stop it chewing its stitches. Stitches may need removing after seven or 10 days, or may be dissolvable. Male cats have no sutures and are normally able to go outdoors again within two days of surgery. In the longer term, cats will have a lower energy requirement and so will need less food.

How will my cat benefit? 
The cat will be less likely to wander, stray, call (if female), spray (if male). The chance of contracting some infectious cat diseases will be reduced, as will the likelihood of developing mammary tumours (breast cancers), pyometra (life threatening womb infections), testicular cancer, and many other illnesses. Male cats in particular will improve in physical body condition and their urine will smell less pungent!

Will the cat get fat?
Neutered cats need less food after surgery, so you will need to reduce their daily food intake after they are neutered. Neutering in itself doesn’t make cats fat.

What behavioural signs does an unneutered tom display? 
Unneutered toms tend to be larger and generally more confident than neutered males. They tend to maintain a large territory area, as they will cover a large area looking for females that are coming into season. Because it is so important for toms to maintain a large territory to reproduce, they are more likely to fight with other cats and leave urine spray marks inside or outside.

Cats Protection has produced ‘A Guide to Early Neutering’; an online video that explains why cats should be neutered at four months of age or younger.


This comprehensive video explains the benefits of neutering cats at this age and why Cats Protection believes it is the most humane and economic solution to the problem of unwanted litters of cats.

Here at Cats Protection Exeter Axhayes all of our kittens available for rehoming and are over 4 months old have been neutered. For more information about neutering please contact us on 01395 232377, thank you.

Thursday, 2 August 2012

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)


FIV is a virus in cats that is similar to the human virus, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). However, FIV does not infect humans and HIV does not infect cats.

About 3-6% of the UK cat population have been infected with FIV. The virus is present in the blood, saliva and other blood fluids of infected cats. The virus is very delicate and cannot survive for long periods outside of the cat. For example, it cannot be transferred from cat to cat on people’s hands or clothes. It is transmitted primarily by cats fighting, but it can also be passed from an infected female cat to her kittens. The virus is very similar to HIV in people, it may in months or years lead to having a weakened immune system. However, the incubation period before the disease develops can last for many years. Many infected cats have years of normal life and may die from something else entirely before their FIV infection causes any problems.  

Signs of FIV are varied but usually result from a weakened immune system and therefore a vulnerability to other infections. Once disease develops infected cats may:
-          become repeatedly ill, for example, with cat flu, sore gums, skin disease or digestive upsets
-          simply seem “off-colour” or have a high temperature
-          take a long time to recover from infections
-          lose weight
-          develop tumours

Cats with FIV may be more susceptible to secondary infections or tumours and may be a risk to other cats. For these reasons, it is important that they are kept indoors so they are separate from FIV negative cats to protect them from other infectious diseases and to stop them giving the virus to other cats.

FIV is diagnosed by blood testing a cat. Vets can quickly perform a test that detects the antibodies to the virus in blood. It is recommended that positive results (particularly those from otherwise healthy cats) are sent for confirmation using a different test at an external laboratory, as false positive results can occur. Kittens less than five to six months old many have had antibodies passed on to them by their infected mothers, but not the virus itself. Only a third of kittens born to FIV-positive mothers actually have FIV themselves. Special tests to detect the virus should be performed on such kittens or antibody tests should be repeated when the kittens are five to six months old.

Results can give a false negative if a cat has only recently been exposed to the virus, as it can take up to eight weeks for the cat to produce antibodies. It is recommended that you wait this time before re-testing negative cats if they are known to have had direct contact with other FIV-positive cats. FIV-negative cats should be kept separate from FIV-positive cats during this period.

Unfortunately, there is currently no vaccine for FIV in the UK although, getting your cat neutered reduces their chance of contracting FIV through fighting. Cats Protection recommends that FIV positive cats are kept indoors and only allowed outside in an impenetrable garden or safe run. They should not be allowed direct contact with any FIV-negative cats. Indoor cats can make extremely rewarding pets. Indoor cats will be safe from road accidents and many other outdoor dangers and will probably be more likely to spend time playing with you than a cat than a cat that fulfil its natural hunting instincts and curiosity outside. It is important that FIV positive cats have regular vaccinations, deflea and deworming treatments and a good diet to help give them every chance of a long and happy life.  










Here at Exeter Axhayes Adoption centre, we home our FIV positive cats as indoor cats. We cannot predict if or when their immune system may be affected and whether disease will develop. If you would like to join the hundreds of kind owners that have adopted an FIV positive cat, please contact us on 01395 232377. So many have been given many happy years together. Please visit our website and facebook page to view our FIV cats available for adoption.